How to Write a Romance Novel

Love is timeless and stories of love transcend time. We still wonder at the romantic tales of the olden days and appreciate those of modern times. Even children's tales are splashed with romance; the prince and princess riding off into the sunset to live happily ever after. If you are interested in how to write a fantasy novel, you should probably start with writing a simple romance novel. Everyone, even the hard-hearted likes a good tale splashed with a good amount of romance. The following tips will show you how to write a fantasy novel, but especially how to write a romance novel.
Before you even embark on the actual plotting and writing, you ought to develop a taste for reading romantic literature. Read novels by famous writers and take note of how these writers have structured their plots. You should also read current releases. This will give you an idea of the latest trends in romantic writing and the type of material editors are looking for in modern writing.
You will also need to carry out thorough research on the market. Get to know what guidelines different publishers have, their standards and topics they prefer as well as those they will have nothing to do with.
You are now ready to begin with the planning of your romantic tale. Decide on the characters you will have; the hero and heroine. Decide on the basic plot of your novel and the theme. You will have to carry out thorough research to ensure that your plot is credible. Researching will help you include real facts and places as well as help the reader understand the theme better.
Having gone through all the above simplified processes of how to write a romance novel you should be better prepared to write.

The Game of Persistence

The game of persistence: As writers we all think that our storyline, sentence structure and grammar is the best and it is only when we come up against an editor or critic that we are told that what we have written is either an illiterate mess, or amateurish and not to give up your day job. So if you are convinced that this is not so then who has the right to decide that which we have spent hours researching and correcting is unfit to be published?
If I told you that my latest novel was brilliant piece of fiction and you have to buy it, would you? No, you wouldn't because you do not know me and as far as you are concerned I have no writing credibility. However, if a newspaper columnist or well-known book critic or even a famous presenter of a television program told you that a particular novel was a brilliant piece of fiction, would you buy it? The probable outcome is that you would, based on their recommendations, but what do they know about your taste in books? Very little, in fact not a thing. So what is the difference between the two?
How many of us have read books by a well known author on the recommendation of a friend, book club, critic or press release only to find that the book we are supposed to be excited about is, as far as you are concerned, a boring excuse for a novel.
Do well known writers survive because of their first success or because of publicity? You can compare it to the older entertainers who still keep appearing on our screens simple because of their past successes. If they had to start again, along with their aging skills, then many of them would be complete failures.
So what makes one book or story any better than the next? Is it the storyline, or prose or something else? Does a writers first book lay a solid foundation on which to build upon for the next? How often have you read a story or novel and you enjoy the read only to learn later on that the book is viewed as a secondary work of art and will never be a best seller.
Why does one person have the right to veto the work of another person when they are expressing only their own opinion. The power of the written word has many users and non-more so than newspaper editors who can skillfully blend and bend a story to have a totally different meaning.
So are there many award winning novels dwelling in a forgotten folder, on some ones computer or a long forgotten manuscript stuffed carelessly in a drawer? The answer is yes there are, so how do you get them noticed and into print? Knowing the right people may help, submitting the manuscript to hundreds of publishers might help. If you are determined to be successful then you have to employ the good old standby called persistence. Use it to get your book out there and do not give up, without persistence you will not even have a chance of survival or success as a novelist.
To quote Mark Twain: The miracle, or the power, that elevates the few is to be found in their industry, application, and perseverance under the prompting of a brave, determined spirit.