Scott Turow – Author Biographies

Scott Turow was born on April 12, 1949 in Chicago, Illinois. After graduating from New Trier High School, he attended Amherst College where he graduated in 1970. He won a scholarship to attend Stanford College Writing Center where he graduated in 1975. He attended Harvard Law School from 1975 to 1978.
Scott says that he knew he wanted to be a writer from the time he was 17 years old. He said he decided to write and practice law when he realized that he wasn't going to support himself as a writer. During his first year at Harvard, he was commissioned to write a book about his experiences as a first year law student. The outcome is "One L", published in 1977.
Scott Turow married Annette, a painter in 1971. They have three children, but divorced in 2008. From 1978 to 1986, Scott was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago where he prosecuted several high profile cases.
Besides his books, Scott has published many articles including reviews and a treatise on why he does not believe in the death penalty. In 2003 his book, "Ultimate Punishment: A Lawyer's Reflection on Dealing with the Death Penalty", was published.
Scott Turow is a partner in a large national law firm, Sonnenshein, Nath and Rosenthal. He has worked pro bono cases especially for those wrongfully convicted, as in the case of Alejandro Hernandez. Mr. Hernandez was accused and convicted of the murder of a young girl. He spent 11 years on death row before Mr. Turow won his release in 1996. Scott says that at one time he was death penalty agnostic, but no more.
Scott Turow was appointed, by then Governor Ryan, to the Commission of Capital Punishment and Reform. He is a trustee at Amherst College and was the Author's Guild for a year and still serves on the board of directors. He also served on the United States Senate Nominations Commission.Scott has practiced law part time since 1986. He says he writes in the morning and becomes a lawyer in the afternoon. He claims that he still has billable hours every day.
Most of Scott Turow's books are legal thrillers. An exemption is "Ordinary Heroes." Scott says that "Ordinary Heroes" is a book that he had wanted to write since he was 17 years old. This book centers on fathers and sons, WWII and hidden pasts. Scott says his own family fabricated their far three of Scott Turow's books have been made into movies: Presumed Innocent in 1990, The Burden of Proof in 1992 and Reversible Errors in 2004.
Times magazine once touted Scott Turow as "The Bard of the Litigious Age." The Los Angeles Times says, "No one writes better mystery suspense novels than Scott Turow."
Scott Turow Novels:
Presumed Innocent (1987)The Burden of Proof (1990)Pleading Guilty (1993)The Laws of Our Fathers (1996)Personal Injuries (1999)Reversible Errors (2002)Ordinary Heroes (2005)Limitations (2006)
Nonfiction:One L (1977)Ultimate Punishment: A Layer's Reflection on Dealing with the Death Penalty (2003)

Thrilling Romance Novels Review

Scott Nicholson writes Liquid Fear, a novel about a man who wakes up with a murdered woman in his motel with only a bottle of pills as a clue to what might have happened. It takes on the mystery of a pharmacy conspiracy that occurred years before and left one of them dead and the rest with acute memory loss. Now, the experiments continue and to keep off dangerous side effects such as phobias and dangerous impulses, they must take pills every four hours, but the pills have run out and the people are cracking beneath the pressure. The story surrounds the struggle of these characters to figure out what to do when the pills have run out and their inhibitions are no longer in their own hold.
Nancy C. Johnson writes Her Last Letter, is about a pair of three sisters, one of which died and left a letter saying that one of her sister's husbands murdered her, as they were involved in intimate relations. Now, it is up to the two living sisters to determine which of their husbands was the killer and which of the ones had the relationship with the sister. Both men are wealthy with mysterious backgrounds and are suspects causing a whirlwind of mistrust and suspicion in the lives of these two women. For danger and suspense, this is a novel to read.
J.R. Rain writes Moon Dance, a novel about a female vampire who has children and a husband and became a vampire only six years ago when she was attacked. While trying to carry on her business, she also has to deal with her husband's dislike of her vampire form and the strain that her cold body puts on their love life. Luckily, she finds a new love later on and manages to overcome her obstacles. Heather Killough-Walden writes A Big Bad Wolf Romance: The Spell. This book is about a young witch who dreams of werewolves, one being a murderer and the other being a man with a dark past who seeks revenge upon a warlock who once took his brother from him. Drawn to each other, this is a story of magical romance that follows the journey of two people whose paths cross and they are unable to do anything to stop the connection between them. The third installment in a series, you could try reading The Strip and The Heat, as well, for a more comprehensive look on the books.
Lori Foster writes When You Dare, a book about a professional mercenary who believes that persona lives should never mix in business. But when a lovely woman asks him to track down a man who had kidnapped her, he can't resist her beauty and is tempted to mix pleasure with business. Molly, however, is in a mission and cannot think of anything but who among her father or old fianc?� might have been the one that kidnapped her. For a book that is filled with passion and crime, as well as the intensity of some dark, shady business, this is the novel to read.

Must-Read Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Being a compulsive reader, you might have read almost all the popular books available at your nearest library or bookstore. There is no dearth of interesting novels and workbooks in the market. But, have you ever come across your much-loved novels in the form of comic illustrations? If not, then you can now enjoy reading your favorite characters in graphic novels and Indian comics.
A few book shops are now stocked with finest collection of comic works and graphic novels. When purchasing books, make sure to collect the following legendary books:
A� Romeo and Juliet
William Shakespeare's most popular play, Romeo and Juliet can be found in the form of comic strips. The book with graphic illustrations and attractive texts carries the power to enchant the readers. Different genres have been maintained to add tension between tragedy and comedy. The story-telling technique creates an imaginary world of love in the mind of its readers.
A� The Three Musketeers
Written by Alexandre Dumas, The Three Musketeers is a popular novel of the 17th century. The world-famous French author has dramatically explained the characters of his novel including d'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos, Aramis, Constance Bonacieux and others. Young d'Artagnan reached Paris and falls in love with the beautiful Constance Bonacieux, the Queen Anne's linen maid. His dream of becoming a musketeer got mingled with his love saga. If you feel like exploring the novel, then make a quick move to purchase the latest edition of The Three Musketeers in the form of a colorful graphic novel.
A� Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela, the former President of South Africa requires no introduction. Being the voice of the people worldwide, he is man who sacrificed his days and nights for the well-being of thousands of people across the nation. You can now read the great deeds of Mandela in the graphic novels. The biography of Nelson Mandela is going through a high demand. Make decision to get one for yourself before it runs out of stock.
A� Gulliver's Travel
Apart from entertaining readers, comic books are now educating people with the understanding of classic literature. Therefore, Gulliver's Travel workbook stands to be a perfect example to promote visual literacy among the comic book fans. Each image Interplays with its related part of the story, thereby attracting readers till they reach to the completion of last line in the book.
A� The Merchant of Venice
This tragic story by William Shakespeare is now being re-introduced in the industry of Indian comics. The graphic images depict dramatic scenes of this popular novel. Each character including Antonio, the merchant of Venice and his friends has been illustrated in the simplest manner.
Besides the above mentioned comic books, there are a lot more titles which offer worth-reading experience. Apart from classic stories and biography of leading personalities, the arena of funny book publication also covers the mythological legends. For instance, you might find books with the saga of mythological characters like Sita, Ravana, Ekalavya and Dronacharya etc. The stories are described in a dialogue form and each interesting scene carries its pictorial representation.
So, get set to enhance your knowledge by reading comic books of interesting titles.

Coward’s Kiss by Lawrence Block

Coward's Kiss is another of Lawrence Block's early 1960's Crime Novels, where everyone is neither black, nor white, but different shades of gray.
Private Detective Ed London is summoned by his creepy brother-in-law Dr. Jack Enright to an apartment on East 51 Street. Jack is not there, but the body of a dead girl is. Jack told Ed he was having an affair with the girl, but he swore to Ed he didn't kill her. Even though Jack admitted he was cheating on Ed's sister Kaye, Ed tries to help Jack stay out of jail by moving the body out of the apartment, which was where Jack was keeping the chick for their trysts, and dumping it in Central Park. Not a good move, Ed. Soon people are looking to kill Ed, while his slimy brother-in-law basically crawls into a simpering little ball of mush.
Coward's Kiss is one of Block's earliest works, but all Block fan's will love his famed roller- coaster style, where no one is whom they seem to be, and surprise ending are always in store for the reader.
Coward's Kiss is a one-night read. But I guarantee you you'll get bang for your buck, if you buy this book.
If you haven't read any of Lawrence Block's novels yet, you'll get great pleasure in reading his later works. Highly recommended are his fifteen, or so Matthew Scudder crime novels. And also his Bernie Rhoddenbarr/Burglar novels, which are written in Block's inimitable comedy style. He also has several Keller "Hit Man" novels that follow the exploits of Keller, who is a killer for hire.

How to Write a Detective Novel

Thousands of people have written about solving crime and a greater number of people read about it! People's interest in this topic fascinates me. Why are so many people interested in solving murders and mysteries? I too am interested in reading this genre and I enjoy watching the television shows and movies that depict successful crime solvers. It does not matter whether the person was poisoned, suffocated, drowned, drugged, driven over by a truck or thrown out of an airplane; the wily detective has a case.
Detectives come in all shapes, sizes, ages and nationalities. Each one has foibles that make him or her different from the others. There are thousands of fictitious detectives. Witness the many television detectives over the last twenty years. There were Colombo, Jonathon Creek, Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple, and Poirot as well as shows like CSI, Pie in the Sky and countless others. They had a different process but the results were the same. Yet they all fascinate us.
In my mind there are several components that lead to an interesting novel of movie in this genre. The first trait is that the detective must be unique. Most detectives are confident and sure of their work. Many times they need to have an accomplice who asks them questions so that the reader can keep up with the detective. The detective must be smarter than the reader. Usually the novel must contain at least one person, usually a beautiful woman who is wronged in some way by an 'evil' person. There also needs to be money involved in some way. Although these are not absolutely necessary in my opinion, many of the successful novels include them. In my novel "ONE," I have created a young humble detective who uses technology as his weapon against crime. He is solving a puzzle that involves the death of a beautiful woman who has accumulated an inordinate amount of money.
The internet is a marvellous place to research how to describe ways to harm people. I fervently hope that the information from these sites is not used in real life. Other places for research include libraries. Become a 'library junky' and your writing will improve.
I find that writing detective novels is most rewarding because the 'evil' person can be dealt whatever punishment that seems appropriate. The number of twists and turns in a detective novel is only limited by your imagination.
Like all forms of writing, practice will help you achieve better outcomes. Become the most interesting detective writer of all time!

Writers! – Keep Your Characters Off the Streets!

All writers have favorite characters from history, and exploring them through story-telling is, at times, difficult to resist. I know, having fallen in Mark Twain quicksand and getting out only by making him share the spotlight with two other characters. Here, then, is rule number one, unless you're going to put a new slant on an old face - seek that character's era, then seek out an utterly anonymous story from behind your famous figure. Great hits have come from exploring rats that sailed with Columbus - and one famous cricket has out-earned many a flesh-and-blood human. So, if Napoleon's your man, go for the assistant cook that peels his potatoes, the roach who lives in one of them or the wayward soul who either made or shines his saber. The minor to anonymous figure in a famous era is nothing less than an undiscovered vein of literary gold.
No one should be dissuaded from choosing an era that most fascinates them. Once chosen, however, it must emit at least a "faux" reality, unless it is off-world. If it's foreign, find someone of that country, literary works and recordings from their story-tellers. More important than the way they do they think? How do they communicate with those around them? How do they feel about those around them? Are they short and curt, broad and chatty, poetic or basic? Upon which "power words" are their conversations based? Do you have a sense of THEIR humor? Are they intimately familiar with the situation in which you put them? Could you act it out in front of a mirror, mastering all of the voices?
If you are writing in a dialect that people recognize or, in most cases, think they recognize, go overboard, far overboard... in the privacy of your studio at the computer. Before you publish, however, "consult consult consult" - then reexamine your copy and "retreat retreat retreat" until you have reached a satisfactory level of subtlety. Then, retreat even further, until you're certain that every nuance of their speech is no more than a hint and natural byproduct of the character's milieu.
Getting the twenty first century out of historical speech is like getting rid of ants or termites, and you can't pass over one word without careful inspection. Many of our colloquialisms have moved to the center of our lexicon, but are still examples of misplaced slang to someone from the eighteenth century. Much of history is based upon class distinction saturated with minute variations of speech. From the hog-slopper to the Stubenmaedchen and on to the queen herself, you'll have to comb out the obvious and overblown in multiple passes. For pieces such as Elizabethan settings, you'd best go the extra mile and have it read aloud with one person per character and a narrator.
Being drawn to a specific slice of life in a specific time is the very best reason to write about it, but have your passport in order and don't write like a tourist. Until we've worked it out to the minutest detail, they always see us coming a mile away.

How to Write a Romance Novel

Love is timeless and stories of love transcend time. We still wonder at the romantic tales of the olden days and appreciate those of modern times. Even children's tales are splashed with romance; the prince and princess riding off into the sunset to live happily ever after. If you are interested in how to write a fantasy novel, you should probably start with writing a simple romance novel. Everyone, even the hard-hearted likes a good tale splashed with a good amount of romance. The following tips will show you how to write a fantasy novel, but especially how to write a romance novel.
Before you even embark on the actual plotting and writing, you ought to develop a taste for reading romantic literature. Read novels by famous writers and take note of how these writers have structured their plots. You should also read current releases. This will give you an idea of the latest trends in romantic writing and the type of material editors are looking for in modern writing.
You will also need to carry out thorough research on the market. Get to know what guidelines different publishers have, their standards and topics they prefer as well as those they will have nothing to do with.
You are now ready to begin with the planning of your romantic tale. Decide on the characters you will have; the hero and heroine. Decide on the basic plot of your novel and the theme. You will have to carry out thorough research to ensure that your plot is credible. Researching will help you include real facts and places as well as help the reader understand the theme better.
Having gone through all the above simplified processes of how to write a romance novel you should be better prepared to write.

The Game of Persistence

The game of persistence: As writers we all think that our storyline, sentence structure and grammar is the best and it is only when we come up against an editor or critic that we are told that what we have written is either an illiterate mess, or amateurish and not to give up your day job. So if you are convinced that this is not so then who has the right to decide that which we have spent hours researching and correcting is unfit to be published?
If I told you that my latest novel was brilliant piece of fiction and you have to buy it, would you? No, you wouldn't because you do not know me and as far as you are concerned I have no writing credibility. However, if a newspaper columnist or well-known book critic or even a famous presenter of a television program told you that a particular novel was a brilliant piece of fiction, would you buy it? The probable outcome is that you would, based on their recommendations, but what do they know about your taste in books? Very little, in fact not a thing. So what is the difference between the two?
How many of us have read books by a well known author on the recommendation of a friend, book club, critic or press release only to find that the book we are supposed to be excited about is, as far as you are concerned, a boring excuse for a novel.
Do well known writers survive because of their first success or because of publicity? You can compare it to the older entertainers who still keep appearing on our screens simple because of their past successes. If they had to start again, along with their aging skills, then many of them would be complete failures.
So what makes one book or story any better than the next? Is it the storyline, or prose or something else? Does a writers first book lay a solid foundation on which to build upon for the next? How often have you read a story or novel and you enjoy the read only to learn later on that the book is viewed as a secondary work of art and will never be a best seller.
Why does one person have the right to veto the work of another person when they are expressing only their own opinion. The power of the written word has many users and non-more so than newspaper editors who can skillfully blend and bend a story to have a totally different meaning.
So are there many award winning novels dwelling in a forgotten folder, on some ones computer or a long forgotten manuscript stuffed carelessly in a drawer? The answer is yes there are, so how do you get them noticed and into print? Knowing the right people may help, submitting the manuscript to hundreds of publishers might help. If you are determined to be successful then you have to employ the good old standby called persistence. Use it to get your book out there and do not give up, without persistence you will not even have a chance of survival or success as a novelist.
To quote Mark Twain: The miracle, or the power, that elevates the few is to be found in their industry, application, and perseverance under the prompting of a brave, determined spirit.