Scott Turow – Author Biographies

Scott Turow was born on April 12, 1949 in Chicago, Illinois. After graduating from New Trier High School, he attended Amherst College where he graduated in 1970. He won a scholarship to attend Stanford College Writing Center where he graduated in 1975. He attended Harvard Law School from 1975 to 1978.
Scott says that he knew he wanted to be a writer from the time he was 17 years old. He said he decided to write and practice law when he realized that he wasn’t going to support himself as a writer. During his first year at Harvard, he was commissioned to write a book about his experiences as a first year law student. The outcome is “One L”, published in 1977.
Scott Turow married Annette, a painter in 1971. They have three children, but divorced in 2008. From 1978 to 1986, Scott was an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago where he prosecuted several high profile cases.
Besides his books, Scott has published many articles including reviews and a treatise on why he does not believe in the death penalty. In 2003 his book, “Ultimate Punishment: A Lawyer’s Reflection on Dealing with the Death Penalty”, was published.
Scott Turow is a partner in a large national law firm, Sonnenshein, Nath and Rosenthal. He has worked pro bono cases especially for those wrongfully convicted, as in the case of Alejandro Hernandez. Mr. Hernandez was accused and convicted of the murder of a young girl. He spent 11 years on death row before Mr. Turow won his release in 1996. Scott says that at one time he was death penalty agnostic, but no more.
Scott Turow was appointed, by then Governor Ryan, to the Commission of Capital Punishment and Reform. He is a trustee at Amherst College and was the Author’s Guild for a year and still serves on the board of directors. He also served on the United States Senate Nominations Commission.Scott has practiced law part time since 1986. He says he writes in the morning and becomes a lawyer in the afternoon. He claims that he still has billable hours every day.
Most of Scott Turow’s books are legal thrillers. An exemption is “Ordinary Heroes.” Scott says that “Ordinary Heroes” is a book that he had wanted to write since he was 17 years old. This book centers on fathers and sons, WWII and hidden pasts. Scott says his own family fabricated their far three of Scott Turow’s books have been made into movies: Presumed Innocent in 1990, The Burden of Proof in 1992 and Reversible Errors in 2004.
Times magazine once touted Scott Turow as “The Bard of the Litigious Age.” The Los Angeles Times says, “No one writes better mystery suspense novels than Scott Turow.”
Scott Turow Novels:
Presumed Innocent (1987)The Burden of Proof (1990)Pleading Guilty (1993)The Laws of Our Fathers (1996)Personal Injuries (1999)Reversible Errors (2002)Ordinary Heroes (2005)Limitations (2006)
Nonfiction:One L (1977)Ultimate Punishment: A Layer’s Reflection on Dealing with the Death Penalty (2003)

How to Write Humorously – Learning From Charles Dickens

In ‘A Tale Of Two Cities’, Dickens had distributed the humour among various pockets: the way he described the characters, the manners that the lords of the land followed in France, and the narrative technique in which he had no competitor. While describing the human tragedies and follies of common men, he had endeavoured to infuse funniness through the comedy of manners. But he had not tried to soften the bitterness of truth that the ongoing revolution was supposed to hold.A�
Charles DickensA�had courage to be an innovator. Standing against all the contemporary writers, he had chosen the subject like poverty in ‘Oliver Twist’.A�A�He obeyed his inner voice-his sincere service to the world in he lived.A�A�Again, even if being the writer of neat fiction, he chose history as background for his novelA�’A Tale of Two Cities’. The writer of ‘Domby and Sons’ and ‘Martin Chuzzlewit’ preferred to narrate rigid truth of the history without reservations, without making compromises. And the result is before our eyes.
He chose theme of history because it contained the hardest challenges the people had faced; he chose it because the larger portion of the people had at last responded to the wildest behaviour shown to them throughout the years. Every drop of blood spilled on the street of Paris, every drop of the sweat fallen on the farms of feudal France, melted into each other and became the blade of the Guillotine. And then everything flew from the power of that Guillotine. Dickens picked up that theme; honoured it in its right perspective; and dealt with it with his masterly skill.A�
While reading Dickens, humour would not fail in helping our strains to disappear. It would make our mind lighter. Had Dickens not been a writer and the humorist as he was, he would have become a social activist. Such were the subjects he chose for his writings. ‘A Tale of Two Cities’, a novel that runs overloaded with the hard facts of an ongoing revolution, it contains salient stock of wits and irony. Though the thematic compulsions restrained Dickens to become outright humorist; he fully counterbalanced it while caricaturing some of the characters.A�A�
If we look at the novel from a different angle, then a war or a revolution is the greatest satire itself. The mankind has never learnt a lesson from the past. We go on slaughtering each other without realising the futility of our actions. Perhaps that was the biggest message this novel should have delivered.A� A�’A Tale of Two Cities’ is the masterpiece novel. It would shine like a gem on a bookshelf.

The Art of War For Writers – Fiction Writing Strategies, Tactics, and Exercises by James Scott Bell

“The Art Of War For Writers: fiction writing strategies, tactics, and exercises” by James Scott Bell is an enlightening, informative, motivating, and practical little gem of a book for anyone who wants to successfully start and finish a publishable novel. I’m a fan of Sun Tzu, and I’m working on selling my first novel, so I was immediately drawn to this book when I saw the title. It was much better than I even anticipated. Bell’s advice is solid and this book contains the essential elements needed to be victorious as a writer.
The wisdom comes in seventy-seven short chapters divided into three main parts: Reconnaissance, Tactics, and Strategy. Under reconnaissance, you find suggestions such as being aware of what the successful writing life is like, put heart into everything you write, and finish your novel. The tactics in part two include testing your premise to prove it worthy, utilizing the Q Factor as a strategic weapon for motivation at just the right time, and whether to outline or not to outline. The third part, Strategy, focuses more on the business of writing, such as goals, networks, when to get an agent and when not to, and promoting your book. I also really liked the chapters on rejections and criticism, something all writers experience as I’m currently learning first hand.
Bell uses quotes from Sun Tzu in places throughout the text, but he also quotes many authors, agents, and editors. There are tons of examples contained in the short chapters, and it’s a book I know I’ll be turning to again and again to assist me with my writing. I’ll look to it for both for practical strategies and suggestions, and for motivation. One of the most important things Bell stresses in various places is to continue to write. He provides quotes from various authors on how they design their typical writing days, but the bottom line is that every writer must be disciplined to hit the keyboard. The final word is encouraging and motivational and I’m sure I’ll read this chapter more than any other. The final words must be remembered and kept on the forefront of all writers, “Keep fighting. Keep writing.”
If you are inspiring to write fiction, I highly recommend “The Art of War For Writers” by James Scott Bell. It is a great addition to any author’s bookshelf, and one that you will turn to again and again as you navigate and pursue victory in the publishing industry.

Thrilling Romance Novels Review

Scott Nicholson writes Liquid Fear, a novel about a man who wakes up with a murdered woman in his motel with only a bottle of pills as a clue to what might have happened. It takes on the mystery of a pharmacy conspiracy that occurred years before and left one of them dead and the rest with acute memory loss. Now, the experiments continue and to keep off dangerous side effects such as phobias and dangerous impulses, they must take pills every four hours, but the pills have run out and the people are cracking beneath the pressure. The story surrounds the struggle of these characters to figure out what to do when the pills have run out and their inhibitions are no longer in their own hold.
Nancy C. Johnson writes Her Last Letter, is about a pair of three sisters, one of which died and left a letter saying that one of her sister’s husbands murdered her, as they were involved in intimate relations. Now, it is up to the two living sisters to determine which of their husbands was the killer and which of the ones had the relationship with the sister. Both men are wealthy with mysterious backgrounds and are suspects causing a whirlwind of mistrust and suspicion in the lives of these two women. For danger and suspense, this is a novel to read.
J.R. Rain writes Moon Dance, a novel about a female vampire who has children and a husband and became a vampire only six years ago when she was attacked. While trying to carry on her business, she also has to deal with her husband’s dislike of her vampire form and the strain that her cold body puts on their love life. Luckily, she finds a new love later on and manages to overcome her obstacles. Heather Killough-Walden writes A Big Bad Wolf Romance: The Spell. This book is about a young witch who dreams of werewolves, one being a murderer and the other being a man with a dark past who seeks revenge upon a warlock who once took his brother from him. Drawn to each other, this is a story of magical romance that follows the journey of two people whose paths cross and they are unable to do anything to stop the connection between them. The third installment in a series, you could try reading The Strip and The Heat, as well, for a more comprehensive look on the books.
Lori Foster writes When You Dare, a book about a professional mercenary who believes that persona lives should never mix in business. But when a lovely woman asks him to track down a man who had kidnapped her, he can’t resist her beauty and is tempted to mix pleasure with business. Molly, however, is in a mission and cannot think of anything but who among her father or old fianc?� might have been the one that kidnapped her. For a book that is filled with passion and crime, as well as the intensity of some dark, shady business, this is the novel to read.

The Problem With Reading About Online MLM

I just finished reading a great eBook about doing online MLM. The eBook had lots of helpful tips, as well as success stories about people who have developed a wonderful passive income stream doing online MLM. The whole eBook was great except for one thing:
There is a world of difference between reading about online MLM and doing it.
What Reading Novels and Reading about Online MLM Have in Common
Don’t get me wrong, I love to read about online MLM. I love that other people read what I write about this business. That’s not the problem. The problem happens when people actually get online, sign up for their blog and social media accounts, and start doing their MLM business online. That’s when the problems crop up. Why?
Let me give you an example. I read this sentence in the eBook on doing MLM online:
“Bob followed this approach, and six months later, moved three levels up his MLM company’s compensation plan.”
That sounds great, right? Bob’s approach was to write a couple of blogs and work three social media platforms. No big deal. And he moved three levels up the compensation plan. That’s great. After all, who can’t do what Bob did for six months, right?
Wrong.
And that’s what reading about online MLM and reading novels share in common: it’s too easy. It is soooooo easy to read about some black-ops superhero kicking butt in a novel, with his special tools, his martial arts moves, and his network of connections. It’s easy to read, hard to do.
Ditto with online MLM. It’s soooooo easy to read about Bob, who just easily taps out six blog posts a week for his two blogs (one for product and one for business), and who handles all of his social media “networking” with ease. So not happening… unless Bob is a psycho workaholic who just LOVES to spend all of his time on the computer after he comes home from his day job. Not.
See, it took only one sentence to write about Bob’s six month’s worth of grueling effort. It takes only one second to read the words “six months later.” But the truth of the matter is, Bob spent six months slaving away. See what I mean? See the difference between one second’s worth of reading and six month’s worth of effort?
Somehow, our brains translate the effort it takes to read ABOUT online MLM into the effort we think it will actually take to do online MLM. It only took a second to read the words, so how hard could it be? That’s what we say to ourselves, all the time. Really.
Online MLM in the Real World
So let’s get down to brass tacks for a minute and talk about doing your MLM business online, in the real world, not in Bob’s superhero world. Is what Bob doing possible? Yes. Is it probable? No. Is the average Joe likely to be able to follow Bob’s path. Nuh-uh.
So what is possible, probable, and likely for the average Joe who wants to do MLM online? Well, here are the facts about online MLM as I understand them based on my real-world experience:
1. Online MLM takes as much time and effort as any other small business. The main difference is that your overhead is much lower than the average bricks and mortar startup storefront.
2. Online MLM is a skill, like any other. Just because you are online doesn’t mean you don’t have to network, build trust, make friends, influence people, etc. You have to do all of that, plus you have to learn to do it in the online world, which has its own set of rules.
3. Keep your day job, if you have one. You don’t need as much capital as you would for a regular startup small business, but you still need cashflow because unless you are a psycho workaholic, you are not going to hit the top of the compensation plan in six months.
Reading about Online MLM: My Advice
After a decade of doing MLM online, my advice is that you should definitely keep reading and learning about doing this business online. Or listening to CDs or watching DVDs. Whatever floats your boat.
The thing is, whenever you run across a sentence, or even an entire article that talks about someone’s success, don’t be tempted to think that it was EVER easy. It NEVER is. Online MLM can create an immensely steady passive income for you. It can be developed into a financial asset. It can do a lot of things. But it takes as much effort as anything else in the world.
So… do keep reading. Just don’t be fooled. Unless the article you are reading describes the blood, sweat, and tears it took a person to reach success in gory detail, learn what you can from the article, but don’t be lulled into the idea that MLM is “rags to riches” with no effort.
Just a word of warning to the wise. I love MLM and I love online MLM even more. I just don’t want MLM to have a bad name in your book because you aren’t a millionaire, or even a thousandaire, in six months.
Slow steady effort is the key.

Thriller Novels: Where Does the Kick Come From?

Scarcely any novel enthusiast has not read any thriller novels at all. The genre is immensely popular with readers of all ages. The best thrillers have provided gripping suspense, exhilaration, and enjoyment to readers since the first beginnings of the genre. Their scope is vast, with many sub-genres.
So, what are they?
Obviously, the novel must must engender thrills in its readers. Straightforward enough, but where are the origins of this ability? The predecessors of thriller novels originated with the writers of early civilizations such as the Greeks or Persians. For example, the Odyssey in Greek and the Mahabharata in Sanskrit were, it can be argued constructed using similar narrative mechanisms to the modern day thriller novels. Originating in the Tenth Century and later translated by Sir Richard Burton, the Arabian Nights narrates the first ever detective thriller as a tale entitled “The Three Apples”.
With this ancestry, the art has grown and contemporary ‘thrill fiction’ can be sub-divided into several genres such as the intelligence related thriller, medical, political, legal case related thriller, historical, technological, action, exploration oriented thriller, armed forces operations thriller, and romantic thriller. At least. The list is practically never ending. Thrilling the readers, that’s all it’s about, and there are so many ways. Normally, all of the genres will be creating thrills by working on several aspects of the reader’s mind: emotions, empathy with a character, impatience, uncertainty, fear, anticipation and even panic. The most able novelist will be toying with several of these areas of the reader’s mind at any one time.
The reader’s imagination, though, is definitely the most effective target area for the novelist to work on, but it is also the aspect needing the highest skill to manipulate effectively. Although each of the sub genres has its inherent dimensions, there are a few regular techniques used by novelists. For example: the disguising of significant facts from the reader until the a climactic point, the dramatic description of combat (even if only verbal). Add in foreshadowing, unexpected twists in the plot and hanging chapter ends and you have the basic devices which are deployed to work up the thrill and excitement levels.
Let’s examine a couple of sub-genres in more detail:
The espionage thriller offers a typical example of the thriller genre-type. Some specialize in the operation of intelligence gathering structures within particular countries and governments – for example the British SIS or the Chinese Guoanbu. Other genre-specialist writers focus on the technology of espionage, be they satellites or miniature cameras. The main character is often an anti-hero having a problem with her organization.
In psychological thriller novels, brain games as well as infatuations, persecutions, mental entrapment and other such themes are the most common structural devices.
So, there’s plenty of scope for writing and giving thrills to readers.

Must-Read Comic Books and Graphic Novels

Being a compulsive reader, you might have read almost all the popular books available at your nearest library or bookstore. There is no dearth of interesting novels and workbooks in the market. But, have you ever come across your much-loved novels in the form of comic illustrations? If not, then you can now enjoy reading your favorite characters in graphic novels and Indian comics.
A few book shops are now stocked with finest collection of comic works and graphic novels. When purchasing books, make sure to collect the following legendary books:
A� Romeo and Juliet
William Shakespeare’s most popular play, Romeo and Juliet can be found in the form of comic strips. The book with graphic illustrations and attractive texts carries the power to enchant the readers. Different genres have been maintained to add tension between tragedy and comedy. The story-telling technique creates an imaginary world of love in the mind of its readers.
A� The Three Musketeers
Written by Alexandre Dumas, The Three Musketeers is a popular novel of the 17th century. The world-famous French author has dramatically explained the characters of his novel including d’Artagnan, Athos, Porthos, Aramis, Constance Bonacieux and others. Young d’Artagnan reached Paris and falls in love with the beautiful Constance Bonacieux, the Queen Anne’s linen maid. His dream of becoming a musketeer got mingled with his love saga. If you feel like exploring the novel, then make a quick move to purchase the latest edition of The Three Musketeers in the form of a colorful graphic novel.
A� Nelson Mandela
Nelson Mandela, the former President of South Africa requires no introduction. Being the voice of the people worldwide, he is man who sacrificed his days and nights for the well-being of thousands of people across the nation. You can now read the great deeds of Mandela in the graphic novels. The biography of Nelson Mandela is going through a high demand. Make decision to get one for yourself before it runs out of stock.
A� Gulliver’s Travel
Apart from entertaining readers, comic books are now educating people with the understanding of classic literature. Therefore, Gulliver’s Travel workbook stands to be a perfect example to promote visual literacy among the comic book fans. Each image Interplays with its related part of the story, thereby attracting readers till they reach to the completion of last line in the book.
A� The Merchant of Venice
This tragic story by William Shakespeare is now being re-introduced in the industry of Indian comics. The graphic images depict dramatic scenes of this popular novel. Each character including Antonio, the merchant of Venice and his friends has been illustrated in the simplest manner.
Besides the above mentioned comic books, there are a lot more titles which offer worth-reading experience. Apart from classic stories and biography of leading personalities, the arena of funny book publication also covers the mythological legends. For instance, you might find books with the saga of mythological characters like Sita, Ravana, Ekalavya and Dronacharya etc. The stories are described in a dialogue form and each interesting scene carries its pictorial representation.
So, get set to enhance your knowledge by reading comic books of interesting titles.

Kick-Ass Review

Stars: Aaron Johnson, Chloe Moretz, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Nicholas Cage
Director: Matthew Vaughn
Release Date: August 3, 2010
MPAA Rating: R
Dave Lizewski is just a normal kid. His only super power is being invisible to girls. He’s never crossed paths with a radioactive spider, never been subjected to intense bursts of gamma radiation, and he doesn’t have mutant DNA. That’s because those things are pretty much impossible. But Dave Lizewski doesn’t think that putting on a mask and helping people has to be impossible. It’s this blend of naiveity and optimism that turns him into the first hero of his kind in the film Kick-Ass.
Based on the hyper-violent comic book created by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr., Kick-Ass is the story of Dave Lizewski’s transformation from normal teenager to normal teenager with a mask. When a scuffle with some thugs is caught on video and posted to the web, it quickly goes viral. Web stardom leads to an inbox filled with requests for help and suddenly Dave, portrayed by relative newcomer Aaron Johnson, is doing hero work, albeit dangerous hero work for your average everyday teen. There’s always safety in numbers though, and Kick-Ass quickly finds himself forming a tenuous alliance with fellow heroes Big Daddy (Nicholas Cage), Red Mist (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) and Hit-Girl (Chloe Moretz) in an effort to take down mob boss Frank D’Amico (Mark Strong).
Director/Producer/Writer Matthew Vaughn (Layer Cake, Stardust) shows his chops here as he lifts John Romita Jr’s images off the comic page and translates them onto the big screen with an uncanny knack for capturing the artist’s original vision. Some scenes, namely the introduction, is almost perfectly frame by frame. In fact, the only thing separating the film from its source material at times is the fidelity of the images. Where Romita inserted a fair amount of grittiness into the comic, Vaughn counters with the same slick production seen in many comic book movies over the past decade. Vaughn toes the line between campy and ghastly and uses the behavior of the characters and the over the top violence that follows their actions, to temper the brightly colored, overly-stylized production and Hollywood feel.
The biggest source of all this gritty violence is little Mindy Macready, a ten-year-old who goes by the name of Hit-Girl. Chloe Moretz, of the upcoming vampire flick Let Me In, steals the scene here with her interpretation of a little girl who would rather play with butterfly knives than dolls. As Dave Lizewski puts it in the comic, “She’s like John Rambo meets Polly Pocket.”
The rest of the cast turn in above average performances as well, especially Mark Strong who makes his role as Frank D’Amico the transition between last year’s Lord Blackwood in Sherlock Holmes and next year’s turn as Sinestro in the upcoming Green Lantern. It’s no wonder he keeps landing these roles- he makes an excellent antagonist.
As hard as it may be to believe, the film doesn’t quite live up to the buckets of blood Millar and Romita Jr. put on display in the graphic novel. There’s still plenty to go around here, and when coupled with copious amounts of strong language and some sexual situations, Kick-Ass is rated an unapologetic R. The slight tweak in the amount of gore isn’t the only departure Matthew Vaughn and co. take from the source material either. While the main story arc is left predominately untouched, purists may get their feathers ruffled in the way some events unfold and slight differences to minor plot points.
There’s not much to get excited about as far as bonus features on the disc. Aside from a 20 minute interview with the comic’s creators, you’re mostly treated to a bunch of storyboards and marketing materials. The director’s commentary track, if you’re into that sort of thing, is your typical casserole of interesting tidbits and soul crushing boredom. Extras aside, the film is good enough on its own to warrant a purchase whether you’re into comics, comic movies or action movies. You’re going to want to get in on the ground floor too. After Vaughn wraps his current project, X-Men: First Class, production on Kick-Ass 2 begins.
Still not convinced? Well, the name of the movie is Kick-Ass. It would be a really bold move if they named it that and it wasn’t, kick-ah.. uh well, you know.. a pretty good movie.

Meet First-Time Urban Fantasy Novelist Susan Goldsmith

Before becoming a novelist, Susan Goldsmith was an undercover private investigator, worked as an outside sales rep, and spent five years in pharmaceutical sales. In this interview, she talks about her journey as an author and her exciting road to publication. She also discusses her creative process and offers tips to aspiring writers.
Q: It’s wonderful to have you here, Susan. Why don’t you start by telling us a little about your background and how you started writing?
A: Stories are what got me through my childhood. When real life was overwhelming, I’d crawl into my imagination where sick mothers could be made better with a magical potion, or crazy fathers weren’t really crazy. They were just more evolved than the rest of us. Could see whole words and realities we couldn’t. Mean teachers? Witches – the whole lot of them. I soon branched out, and after sitting in Stephen King’s head for a while, decided my life was a Disney movie compared to the stuff his characters endured. Poor Carrie. Now that girl had issues!
I loved stories, and had an endless supply of original ideas that would make fantastic books, but darn it, no matter how hard I willed those ideas to be carried through osmosis from my brain to my favorite authors’, it never happened. There they sat, alone in the dark, wilting, while I pursued every career, but writing, and no, graduating with a degree in Journalism most definitely doesn’t count. Journalism and imagination are two words that don’t belong in the same sentence.
A creative imagination was also frowned upon in my brief stint as an undercover private investigator with Pinkerton when I was placed in a company (no, I’m not telling which one!), and was told to write down my observations. Uh oh, I had a captive audience but couldn’t embellish what I was seeing and boy was my imagination coming up with some really good stuff. In reality, I was bored silly. Eventually that boredom had me shaking things up… but that’s another story entirely.
Several career paths later, fate intervened and I found myself home, being a full time mother and wife. Suddenly, I was staring at the blank computer screen, not writing, just staring. I’d make a point to walk by it on my way to the bathroom, in-between Barney episodes, or during those times when my children actually did fall asleep during nap time.
Eventually, I did turn the computer on, and have been writing ever since.
Q: Congratulations on the release of your first novel, Abithica. That’s an unusual name. How did you come up with it and what does it mean?
A: Abithica is a word I made up. Without giving too much away, it is the name of the main character, so it had to be both unique and otherworldly.
Q: What is Abithica about and what was your inspiration for it?
A: Abithica must borrow all that she is from others: names, lives, even bodies, but only for periods of time she cannot control. What is she, and why is she compelled to fix the lives of the people she inhabits, even the despicable ones?
When she switches into the troubled life of Sydney Turner, she ends up breaking the one rule that has sustained her, the one thing in her control-never get attached-and learns the pain of loving and being loved in return.
My vacuum, Thomas Moore and my very persistent imagination were the inspiration behind Abithica. Maybe I should explain that. You see, all my best thoughts have come while pulling a vacuum. Now enter Thomas Moore. He wrote a book called Care of the Soul. In it, he asked a very profound question: what is your worst fear? Hmmm, what is my worst fear, I wondered. Naturally, I grabbed said vacuum and unleashed my imagination.
Losing my husband and children was the answer. Oh, but what if I was taken from them without their knowledge and they didn’t even know I was gone? Ouch! That would definitely suck. But what would suck even more is if another soul took my place and I was there, unseen, invisible, watching their lives continue as if I had never existed.
I was getting closer to my worst nightmare, but I wasn’t quite there yet. It needed a little something more. Got it! What if the body I was in had never really belonged to me in the first place? What if it was me who had been the intruder all along? I had been borrowing the woman’s life… and now… she wanted it back.
The question became an obsession, and my vacuum and I spent a lot of time together. Soon, the idea of “switching” was born. It grew legs and arms and even acquired a face, Abithica’s face.
Q: What is your protagonist like? Tell us something irresistible about her.
A: She is you and me. She is anybody who has ever asked the questions, why am I here? Is there a God, a purpose, a cosmic plan? She perceives herself as a victim, a pawn in some cosmic joke, only to discover in the end she is oh, so much more!
Q: Who is your target reader?
A: My target readers are bound to be urban fantasy lovers, the romantic at heart, and those of us who like to ponder all those enormous, unanswerable questions about life, and what the heck we’re doing here.
Q: How would you describe your creative process while writing this book? Was it stream-of-consciousness writing, or did you first write an outline?
A: You have no idea how funny that question is! My “creative process”, if you insist on calling it that, was throwing tantrum after tantrum. I wrote and I wrote and I wrote, but the words… they weren’t matching the woman in my head. The tone was wrong. The voice was wrong. The action was wrong. The whole darn story was wrong. It wasn’t Abithica, not even close.
The problem I soon learned was I didn’t have an outline, so I ended up re-writing the first chapter 30 different ways and every one of them was the beginning of a completely different story. I was like an artist standing over an empty canvas. Was I going to use pastels, pencil or paint? Was it going to be a nature scene, or a portrait? Why not an elephant? Did it even have to be on a canvas? Why not the side of a building or a sidewalk? I had no idea so I kept trying a little of everything, until eventually, nothing worked and I found myself pinned to the ground, screaming uncle.
At the same time, I was well aware that some of my best writing had come about by accident when I had unwittingly allowed the characters to tell their own story. They were the writer, I was the vessel. Every single writing session after that, it’s what I strove to duplicate. I’d sit down at the keyboard, clear my mind, and relax enough to set the characters free. On a really good day, they’d talk for eight hours straight and take me places I had never even imagined. Eventually, I got better at it, I started to set an alarm to remind myself to eat. I’d then set it to remind myself to start dinner and then again to remind myself to pick up the kids. This was the reason I wrote, and the reason I kept coming back for more.
I had a problem though. What I needed was something to keep Abithica on task, without constricting the creative flow I craved. The answer: a plot summary. I took the next couple of days building on that concept until I had a sketchy beginning, middle and end. I now had a direction, but Abithica still had plenty of wiggle room to be creative and I was still willing to follow her on whatever tangents she chose to take me on.
Q: What is your writing schedule like?
A: My writing schedule revolves around my family. When the girls are at school, my hubby is at work, and I’m alone, (if it’s possible to be alone with 3 dogs, 2 cats and a bird!) I unleash my imagination and hold on for dear life. My favorite part is the end, when I get to read the crazy places my imagination took me that day.
Q: How did you find Twilight Times Books?
A: Twilight Times Books was recommended to me by my mentor, Gerry Mills, who helped me put some “magic” into my writing. It didn’t hurt either that TTB was recommended by Predators & Editors, or that the water cooler discussion on Absolute Write had nothing but positive things to say about TTB and its founder, Lida Quillen.
Q: What has been the most surprising aspect of publishing for you so far?
A: I was delusional. I actually thought when I wrote, The End, I was done. Oh contraire! That was only the beginning. The hardest writing I’ve ever done was condensing 95,000 words into a one sentence summary!
Now, I’m learning the wonderful world of marketing. All I can say is, God Bless Goodreads! If it wasn’t for that website nobody would know Abithica exists, and believe me… she is so done with that!
Q: I hear there’s a sequel in the horizon. When is it coming out?
A: Yup, there is a sequel. I am 40,000 words into it. The beginning and the end are done. All I’m doing now is filling in the middle.
Q: What is your best tip for aspiring novelists?
A: Don’t just talk about it, do it. Write it for yourself, and then later, after you’re convinced it’s a masterpiece, set it in a drawer and forget about it, the longer, the better. Then read it with fresh eyes. Fix all the problems, and then repeat, again, and again, and again….

Coward’s Kiss by Lawrence Block

Coward’s Kiss is another of Lawrence Block’s early 1960’s Crime Novels, where everyone is neither black, nor white, but different shades of gray.
Private Detective Ed London is summoned by his creepy brother-in-law Dr. Jack Enright to an apartment on East 51 Street. Jack is not there, but the body of a dead girl is. Jack told Ed he was having an affair with the girl, but he swore to Ed he didn’t kill her. Even though Jack admitted he was cheating on Ed’s sister Kaye, Ed tries to help Jack stay out of jail by moving the body out of the apartment, which was where Jack was keeping the chick for their trysts, and dumping it in Central Park. Not a good move, Ed. Soon people are looking to kill Ed, while his slimy brother-in-law basically crawls into a simpering little ball of mush.
Coward’s Kiss is one of Block’s earliest works, but all Block fan’s will love his famed roller- coaster style, where no one is whom they seem to be, and surprise ending are always in store for the reader.
Coward’s Kiss is a one-night read. But I guarantee you you’ll get bang for your buck, if you buy this book.
If you haven’t read any of Lawrence Block’s novels yet, you’ll get great pleasure in reading his later works. Highly recommended are his fifteen, or so Matthew Scudder crime novels. And also his Bernie Rhoddenbarr/Burglar novels, which are written in Block’s inimitable comedy style. He also has several Keller “Hit Man” novels that follow the exploits of Keller, who is a killer for hire.